“Call for feedback!” Petrie Museum

2018-08-24

Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology posted some days ago on Twitter "Call for feedback!" The Museum is looking to improve access to the organization and as the tweet notes "we would be very interested to hear your suggestions on how we could best do that."

So, if you have any suggestions that you want to share with Petrie Museum, please email anna.garnett@ucl.ac.uk

Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London is part of UCL Museums and Collections. It contains over 80,000 objects and ranks among some of the world's leading collections of Egyptian and Sudanese material. The museum was established as a teaching resource for the Department of Egyptian Archaeology and Philology at University College at the same time as the department was established in 1892. The initial collection was donated by the writer Amelia Edwards. The first Edwards Professor, William Matthew Flinders Petrie, conducted many important excavations, and in 1913 he sold his collections of Egyptian antiquities to University College, creating the Flinders Petrie Collection of Egyptian Antiquities.

The museum is at Malet Place, near Gower Street and the University College London science library. Admission is free, and as of January 2018 the museum is open each afternoon 1pm-5pm, Tuesday to Saturday, with researchers accommodated at other times as well. 

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